Daniel works at DIW

Daniel Kemptner

health economics education economics public economics pension policy applied microeconometrics

About

Daniel Kemptner works as a research associate at DIW Berlin. After having studied economics at the University of Mannheim and the University of Toronto, he joined the Graduate Center of DIW Berlin in September 2009. In June 2013, he obtained his Ph.D. at the Free University Berlin. He is an empirical microeconomist who uses large household survey and administrative data sets to advance our understanding of economic inequality. In more detail, he uses structural dynamic life cycle models and evaluation techniques to analyze determinants of lifetime income as well as policy measures that affect the lifetime income distribution. Thereby, the inequality of lifetime income is a key barometer of disparities in living standards. In this context, health and education as drivers of inequality in life cycle outcomes has been a particular focus of his research. Further, his work aims at providing new insights on the government’s possibilities to affect income inequality through public policies.

 

 

CV

Curriculum Vitae
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Research statement
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Teaching statement
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Research - Working Papers

Insurance, Redistribution, and the Inequality of Lifetime Income (Job Market Paper)
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Research - Published Papers

Health-Related Life Cycle Risks and Public Insurance (Journal of Health Economics)
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The rising longevity gap by lifetime earnings – Distributional implications for the pension system (Journal of the Economics of Ageing)
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Changes in Compulsory Schooling and the Causal Effect of Education on Health: Evidence from Germany (Journal of Health Economics)
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The Role of Time Preferences in Educational Decision Making (Economics of Education Review)
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Effectiveness of early retirement disincentives: Individual welfare, distributional and fiscal implications (Labour Economics)
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Bayesian procedures as a numerical tool for the estimation of an intertemporal discrete choice model (Empirical Economics)
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Spillover effects of maternal education on child’s health and health behavior (Review of Economics of the Household)
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